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osgood schlatter's

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I am a PT Assistant student and I am doing research on osgood schlatter’s disease. I am trying to find out if adults who had OSD as a child are more likely to have knee problems as an adult, like arthritis. Please let me know. Thanks!

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  1. I was diagnosed with OSD in both of my knees when I was right around 11 years old. I remember the intense pain I would have , especially at night,in my knees. I was very active and had to wear knee braces when I would participate in sporting events. This actually helped out alot. I would say that the pain subsided when I turned 13 or 14. I am now 30 and still very active and have had no problems with my knees since.

  2. Colleen:I’m a 50 yr-old male who experienced OSD in my left knee as a young teenager. I still have significantly greater sensitivity and pain in that knee…kneeling is very difficult and any sharp blow to the lump is extremely painful. After much research on the subject, my findings indicate that the condition is related to not only heavy levels of activity as a young teen, but also is most prevalent in kids who experience rapid growth spurts earlier than most children (as I did). This is NOT just a childhood /developmental disease; you have it for life, although the symptoms are not as severe. My studies also show, however, that strengthening the quadriceps helps reduce the symptoms. I haven’t found any link to arthritis, though, and my physical activity has only been limited by my pain tolerance.

  3. I got OSD from my obsession with jumping off swings as a 10 year old tomboy. I have it only in my left knee with the hellish bump, like the other responders. I’m 28 now. My knee has gotten gradually worse since I stopped growing. It buckles and collapses, swells up if I do too much exercise, and hurts, well, all the time–for 18 years. My right leg compensates for it causing my right calf to be 2 inches bigger around. My hip alignment is off as well as my gait.I too am concerned about arthritis and other joint problems. I was told by my doctor in college that I could get my OSD knee fixed, but I would be on crutches for 6 months. If you come up with any answers, please email me.

  4. I saw your question posted on the internet, I am not a doctor, however I am a 39year old mother of 2 who had suffered from Osgood Schlatter as a child. I have an appointment to see and orthopedic docter on 1/29/03, if you like I will let you know what the otcome of the visit is. I believe it has to do with the OS as a child and the fact that I may have arthritis as well. I’ll keep you posted, feel free to contact me for your study.Good luck

  5. : I am a PT Assistant student and I am doing research on osgood schlatter’s disease. I am trying to find out if adults who had OSD as a child are more likely to have knee problems as an adult, like arthritis. Please let me know. Thanks! I developed OSD in middle school and it never went away. In fact the lump on my knee has increased in size. I have trouble standing from a kneeling position because the knee is weak and painful. Climbing stairs,squating,etc. is bothersome.

  6. Im a 31yr.old and as a child had the Osgood-Schlatter Disease. Well now as an adult I still have the same problems as a child, also I have a big knot on my knee that hurts all down my leg and foot. Please if any one can help me let me know. Thanks

  7. Colleen,I think that I read somewhere that about 60% of adults who once experienced OSD have some pain with kneeling when they are adults. I think this is pretty much the only (as well as the typical) adult complication. I am not aware of any studied linking adolescent OSD to adult arthritis, nor any other adult complication. If you learn otherwise, please write back and let us know what you find out.

    • Hello,I am 27 years old and was diagnosed( both knees) and treated with OSD as a young child. I wore a cast( a full leg plaster cast- thigh to ankle) on my left leg for months and I experience no pain today. My right leg was never treated and I suffer with intense pain every single day. I need to be treated and resolve this ongoing pain issue. I would appreciate any information. Thanks. : : : Colleen,: For what it’s worth –: I’m a 53-year-old heavy exerciser only recently : diagnosed with OSD thanks to X-rays after a: sledding accident. OSD was never a problem in: my adolescence, (although my tubercles were always more prominent than among my friends at that age) but in my 30s and especially 40s very high-gear bicycling (powering up hills in an unusually high gear ratio) gradually caused my tibial tubercles to grow markedly and these were often moderately sore during high-training months. Kneeling as an adult has been extremely uncomfortable in the past 20-odd years because of the prominence of these tubercles (both legs but mostly in the R leg.) I haven’t seen much available on active cases of adult OSD but that seems to be going on with me.

  8. : : Colleen,For what it’s worth –I’m a 53-year-old heavy exerciser only recently diagnosed with OSD thanks to X-rays after asledding accident. OSD was never a problem inmy adolescence, (although my tubercles were always more prominent than among my friends at that age) but in my 30s and especially 40s very high-gear bicycling (powering up hills in an unusually high gear ratio) gradually caused my tibial tubercles to grow markedly and these were often moderately sore during high-training months. Kneeling as an adult has been extremely uncomfortable in the past 20-odd years because of the prominence of these tubercles (both legs but mostly in the R leg.) I haven’t seen much available on active cases of adult OSD but that seems to be going on with me.

  9. : Colleen,I was diagnosed with osd in the seventh grade. I experienced severe pain after physical activities such as basketball, baseball and football. The bumps on my knees persited with time but the pain subsided in my 20’s. I am currently 37 and work as a fisheries biologist which requires somewhat intense field work. The pain in my knees (left in particular with the largest lump) is back and at times at night as severe as my teen years. I experience chronic aching pain daily with intense pain after moderate to heavy activity. I’m not sure if I can continue with this type of work for much longer due to the chornic pain in my knee. I would be very interested in any research that you are doing on this disease. I am interested in your findings and suggestions for treatments, and would tell you my thoughts on osd treatments.

  10. I was diagnosed with OS in 7th grade and spent the majority of that year sitting out gym class. it was only diagnosed after I refused to play and received an F for that 6 week period. my parents took me in knowing I loved gym class and would have never failed it. I was a cheerleader in HS and played softball from age 9 to the present. I was a catcher for 6 years. in HS I was told I had acute tendonitis in my knees after going to the trainer complaining that I would make it 1/2 way through my second lap around the field running before practice and then collapse in center field. I still have problems with them that range from pain to a mild discomfort from a repetitive motion (ie exercise machines at the gym…driving a stick shift for a long period of time). but that usually goes away if I straighten my leg and bend it slowly. my knee will pop (like when you pop your knuckles) I have always wondered if they were related and would be interested in your findingsAngela Wrenn. : Colleen,

  11. I share in the frustration of OSD being labeled as an adolescent disease that goes away. I had freakish growth spurt when I was 12 or so. OSD came on then and has never gone away. The pain has subsided somewhat, but that may be because I no longer have a P.E. teacher forcing me to run regardless of injury! 🙂 Th bumps are still there, if I squat down I usually need to brace myself on something to get back up, I can’t walk long distances or hike without a brace, and forget about kneeling on the ground and puting any pressure on the bumps… that still hurts like a S.O.B.! My involuntary reaction of jerking away when anyone gets close to my knee has gone away, but I’m here to tell ya, the OSD hasn’t!

  12. : As a result, my right knee was placed in a walking cast for 3-4 weeks. I have never had OSD reoocur in that knee.: However, the pain was soo bad in high school I just stopped laying sports. The OSD in my left knee, while it hurt sometimes, rarely became seriously inflamed with pain. As a result, it was never treated the way my right knee was.: I be;lieve a substantial immobilization during the growth period is the key to lessening the severity of OSD.: Anyway, I am 39 years old. My left knee hurts daily and if I am too active I can barely walk.: Freshmen football is still childhood age where I’m from. I got it around age 13-14 when I had my large growing spurt, 6 inches in about a year. I was limited to walking only for 6 months, no bike, no baseball, no football, etc…I healed pretty much what I consider 100%, played Varsity Tennis in College, but now that I’m 38, severe temperature changes still make them a little tender. The worst part is having the big bumps below the knee that stick out and can be tender if you horse around much on your knees, like playing with the nephews/nieces.

  13. Hi — I am replying to the message below. I am a 50 year old female and have recently developed a significant case of tendinitis precisely in & around my old osgood schlatters site (rt knee). Maybe this is uncommon but I thought I would let you know. I go to the Y several times a week and also do snow-skiing, and am finding I will probably have to lay off such activities for a while. The pain is almost exactly like the pain I had at age 11 when I first developed O-S. Good luck. Thanks, Sarie M.

  14. : Colleen,: I think that I read somewhere that about 60% of adults who once experienced OSD have some pain with kneeling when they are adults. I think this is pretty much the only (as well as the typical) adult complication. I am not aware of any studied linking adolescent OSD to adult arthritis, nor any other adult complication. If you learn otherwise, please write back and let us know what you find out. I am currently 25 and have yet to overcome OSD. I would like to know if you guys have came in contact with anyone who is as old as myself that has yet to have this pain subside. I have removed myself from all involvement in sports to no avail and am considering excision as my only option. Please contact me with any info you might have. Thanks in advance.

  15. I am tired of reading the literature on OSD claiming this is solely a childhood disease. I was diagnosed with OSD after complaints of pain in freshman football. As a result, my right knee was placed in a walking cast for 3-4 weeks. I have never had OSD reoocur in that knee.However, the pain was soo bad in high school I just stopped laying sports. The OSD in my left knee, while it hurt sometimes, rarely became seriously inflamed with pain. As a result, it was never treated the way my right knee was.I be;lieve a substantial immobilization during the growth period is the key to lessening the severity of OSD.Anyway, I am 39 years old. My left knee hurts daily and if I am too active I can barely walk.

  16. hi,i was just digging around in here in OSD land and thought i’d post on this.i now know that the struggles with my knees that i experienced as a kid was osgood schlatter disease. i had no idea what it was back when it all took place. i really only found out that it actually had a name a few years back. now,i’ve made it to the ripe old age of 47 and still continue to have occasional bouts with the tenderness of my prominent “knee knots”. hitone of them and i’ll still fold up like a cheap suitcase!…anyway, i learned many years ago that regular kneeling was not something that was in my bag of tricks. my knees are still easily strained (the right being considerably worse than the left)soi’ve basically always been careful with them. repeated stair useage also tends to flair them up…i haven’t seen much in the way of this in regardsto adulthood but i’m here to tell you that it does not necessarily go away with age or time as indicated in almost everything i’ve read hereon the ‘net. well,there are exceptions to almost everything and unfortunately i wound up being that exceptionwith regards to OSD!!….i guess i’ll get myself checked out…could be arthritis i suppose. if it is…the feeling neverhas changed from the original pain that beganwhen i was probably 10 or 11….ok…thanks..jry

  17. I had OS when I was a kid (I still have the lump on my left knee). I’m now 50 yrs old and I don’t have any problems with that knee. When I do have any arthritus flare ups (not severe at all and not often), I never have it in my left knee. It’s in my right knee. I hyper extended my right knee 4 months ago and the problems I’m having in my right knee are due to that (I’m hoping not due to arthritus). : Colleen,: I think that I read somewhere that about 60% of adults who once experienced OSD have some pain with kneeling when they are adults. I think this is pretty much the only (as well as the typical) adult complication. I am not aware of any studied linking adolescent OSD to adult arthritis, nor any other adult complication. If you learn otherwise, please write back and let us know what you find out.

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