SEARCH KNOWLEDGE BASE: 10.000 Q&A

Achilles Tendon?

Hi Dr. RobinsonI’m 44 years old, 5’7″, 150 lbs, male, I’ve been running since 1973 with no major injuries. Run 30-50 miles a week. Last race was in June, 1/2 marathon, Palos Verdes, Ca.Two weeks ago, (my calf had been tight all week) I was warming up for a track workout and during isometrics, felt a pop in my lower left leg.
I immediately walked off the track and the ‘spot’ right at the base of the left calf as burning and extremely sensitive.
I was not able to put full weight on the leg/foot.
It has been two weeks and everything ‘seems’ okay.
I can move my toes up and down and in a circle.
So, from all accounts things seem back to normal.
What kind of injury do you think this was? Do you have any suggestions or recommendations as far as resuming training? Thanks in advance,Tres Smith

Best Answers

Terry Robinson PT

Terry Robinson PT

: I'm 44 years old, 5'7", 150 lbs, male, I've been running since 1973 with no major injuries. Run 30-50 miles a week. Last race was in June, 1/2 marathon, Palos Verdes, Ca.: Two weeks ago, (my calf had been tight all week) I was warming up for a track workout and during isometrics, felt a pop in my lower left leg. I immediately walked off the track and the 'spot' right at the base of the left calf as burning and extremely sensitive. I was not able to put full weight on the leg/foot. It has been two weeks and everything 'seems' okay. I can move my toes up and down and in a circle. So, from all accounts things seem back to normal. : What kind of injury do you think this was? Do you have any suggestions or recommendations as far as resuming training?: Thanks in advance,: Tres Smith: The most common injury to the calf is termed "Tennis Leg", a tear to the medial head of the Gastrocnemius or calf muscle. Some muscular fibers tear away from the tendon and causes localized pain, swelling, loss of function and weakness. This injury may take up to 6 weeks to go away 100%. Do not return to running until it is 100% back to normal. This is an injury that can linger for months if left untreated. Slow, gently, painfree stretches, 2 to 3 times per day help regain flexibility. Once you can walk normal and go up and down stairs without pain, begin calf raises, 3 sets of 10 building up to 3 sets of 30 reps on both feet at the same time. Stationary cycle maintains strength and cardiovascular fitness. Light massage can improve circulation. Also stretch your hamstrings too.Let me know how it does


1 Comment found

    Terry Robinson PT

    9 10

    : I’m 44 years old, 5’7″, 150 lbs, male, I’ve been running since 1973 with no major injuries. Run 30-50 miles a week. Last race was in June, 1/2 marathon, Palos Verdes, Ca.: Two weeks ago, (my calf had been tight all week) I was warming up for a track workout and during isometrics, felt a pop in my lower left leg. I immediately walked off the track and the ‘spot’ right at the base of the left calf as burning and extremely sensitive. I was not able to put full weight on the leg/foot. It has been two weeks and everything ‘seems’ okay. I can move my toes up and down and in a circle. So, from all accounts things seem back to normal. : What kind of injury do you think this was? Do you have any suggestions or recommendations as far as resuming training?: Thanks in advance,: Tres Smith: The most common injury to the calf is termed “Tennis Leg”, a tear to the medial head of the Gastrocnemius or calf muscle. Some muscular fibers tear away from the tendon and causes localized pain, swelling, loss of function and weakness. This injury may take up to 6 weeks to go away 100%. Do not return to running until it is 100% back to normal. This is an injury that can linger for months if left untreated. Slow, gently, painfree stretches, 2 to 3 times per day help regain flexibility. Once you can walk normal and go up and down stairs without pain, begin calf raises, 3 sets of 10 building up to 3 sets of 30 reps on both feet at the same time. Stationary cycle maintains strength and cardiovascular fitness. Light massage can improve circulation. Also stretch your hamstrings too.Let me know how it does

LEAVE A REPLY

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *